Category Archives: Quotable Writers

Quotable Writers: Roger Angell

Oh yes, is it ever! When I first saw this quote from New Yorker writer and editor, Roger Angell, it said perfectly what I had been thinking just that morning.  Which was: I don’t want to have to think before I write something. I wanted it to come burbling out of my unconscious, preferably via an app that creates a conduit between my brain and my fingers on the keyboard. Is there an app for that–ya think?  

While Roger Angell, who has spent a lifetime writing award winning essays and as the fiction editor for the New Yorker, uttered these words of advice, I’m sure he has never felt the angst of sitting down to write and–blank, there’s nothing there. Of course not. Real writers, of which Angell is certainly one, never face a blank page without a veritable fountain of words–superb, multi-syllabled, emotionally evocative words pouring forth.

I, on the other hand, am obviously am not a real writer since I face the blank page syndrome on many occasions. Usually when I’m poised at my desk full of grit and determination to write something. I’m not sure what, but something articulate, meaningful, and, yes, wonderful. Then I remember Angell’s words and realize that my problem is one of form and not content. That is, I can picture the printed page, but have no idea what the words on it actually say. And that, I’ve learned over the years, means I’m not done thinking about this particular piece of writing. It’s back to the drawing board–the notes, the research, the talking it out in my head, and so on–that I must go.

It gets down to what is the bottom line of writing: that it is essentially a tool of communication. So if you haven’t put in the thinking time, then you really have little to communicate.

How do you handle the blank page syndrome? Do you ever sit down primed and prepped To Write and–nothing happens? So what do you do? 

 

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